Daily Paid Collective Agreement Trinidad

Yes, if you are paid by the hour in accordance with Article 8(2) of the Maternity Protection Act, you are considered to be employed continuously if you work 150 days within twelve months and are therefore entitled to paid maternity leave. This is the same person employed by the Trinidad company since September last year, so I have benefits to which I am entitled? I don`t even have time to go to the doctor, I don`t get paid for it. So, I`m entitled to nis? What if it`s not permanent? Can the contract be terminated? I started working under contract recently, and I discover that I am 4 months pregnant. I know I couldn`t get paid for my motherhood, but I just want to make sure I have another job in the end. Being on sick leave in July, does this mean that I have not met the criteria for continuous work of 12 months to qualify for maternity benefit? A- Sick leave does not interrupt the service. Am I entitled to paid maternity leave and NIS benefits? A-Yes Hello, I am a gov contract worker who has been employed since August 15, 2014. On July 7, 2015, I had to spend two weeks on sick leave because of an infection. After these two weeks, I returned to work and intend to go on maternity leave at the end of October. Does this mean that, since my sick leave in July, I have not met the criteria to work continuously for 12 months to receive maternity benefit? Am I entitled to paid maternity leave and NIS benefits? A union must have the support of an absolute majority of workers to obtain bargaining rights.

This requirement limits the right to collective bargaining. In addition, collective bargaining is subject to mandatory mediation and must cover at least three years, so it is almost impossible for such agreements to include workers who have short-term contracts. According to the National Trade Union Center, the requirement that all negotiations be conducted by the public sector negotiating committee and not through government authority or public industry has been an additional restriction that has resulted in significant delays. Some unions claimed that the government was undermining the collective bargaining process by putting pressure on the Committee to offer increases of no more than 5% over three years. . . .